The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety and phobia in adolescents

Quincy J. J. Wong*, Ronald M. Rapee

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The highest incidence rates for social anxiety disorder (SAD) occur during the period from late childhood to early adulthood. A number of factors that increase vulnerability for the development of SAD have been proposed in the literature, including genes, temperament, biological factors, cognitive factors, parent factors, life events, peer experiences, performance deficits, general learning mechanisms, and cultural factors. These proposed aetiological factors have been given different weightings in theoretical accounts of the aetiology of SAD. Genes, temperament, cognitive factors, parent factors, life events, and peer experiences are generally emphasised in theoretical accounts, while biological factors, performance deficits, general learning mechanisms, and cultural factors have received less emphasis. The proposed aetiological factors have also been empirically examined to varying extents in the literature. In general, the majority of research into the proposed aetiological factors has been limited by the use of cross-sectional designs and the recruitment of individuals already diagnosed with SAD. Further research is needed to obtain better evidence to evaluate the aetiological role of the proposed factors. Such research will ultimately help to develop efficacious early intervention and prevention strategies for SAD.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSocial Anxiety and Phobia in Adolescents
    Subtitle of host publicationDevelopment, Manifestation and Intervention Strategies
    EditorsKlaus Ranta, Annette M. La Greca, Luis-Joaquin Garcia-Lopez, Mauri Marttunen
    Place of PublicationCham
    PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
    Pages11-37
    Number of pages27
    ISBN (Electronic)9783319167039
    ISBN (Print)9783319167022
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

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