The differential impact of agency and pathway thinking on goal pursuit and university exam performance

Monique F. Crane*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The present study examines the interaction between agency and pathway thinking on performance outcomes. The study used a repeated-measures design to examine the role of agency and pathway thinking on goal pursuit emotions (e.g., determination), secondary appraisal, and final exam performance in a group of university psychology students. Consistent with previous mental health research (Arnau, Rosen, Finch, Rhudy, & Fortunato, 2007; Cramer & Dyrkacz, 1998), the present findings suggest a dominant role for agency thinking in performance. Moreover, there was a reliable interaction between pathway and agency thinking in the prediction of goal pursuit and performance. The interactions consistently revealed that when agency thinking was high, pathway thinking was generally irrelevant to our various measures of goal pursuit. These findings challenge the additive role of agency and pathway thinking suggested by hope theory (Snyder, 2002).

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)20-25
    Number of pages6
    JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
    Volume58
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

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