The effect of disease risk probability and disease type on interest in clinic-based versus direct-to-consumer genetic testing services

Kerry Sherman, Laura Kate Shaw, Katrina Champion, Fernanda Caldeira, Margaret McCaskill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The effect of disease-specific cognitions on interest in clinic-based and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing was assessed. Participants (N = 309) responded to an online hypothetical scenario and received genetic testing-related messages that varied by risk probability (25, 50, 75 %) and disease type (Alzheimer’s disease vs. Type 2 Diabetes). Post-manipulation interest increased for both testing types, but was greater for clinic-based testing. Interest was greater for Type 2 Diabetes than for Alzheimer’s disease, the latter perceived as more severe and likely, and less treatable and preventable. For DTC testing only, participants allocated to the high risk condition (75 %) had greater testing interest than those in the low (25 %) category. DTC testing is perceived as a viable, but less preferred, option compared with clinic-based testing. Particularly when considering DTC genetic testing, there is a need to emphasize subjective disease-related perceptions, including risk probability.

LanguageEnglish
Pages706-714
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Oct 2015

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Genetic Services
Genetic Testing
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Alzheimer Disease
Cognition
Direct-To-Consumer Screening and Testing

Cite this

Sherman, Kerry ; Shaw, Laura Kate ; Champion, Katrina ; Caldeira, Fernanda ; McCaskill, Margaret. / The effect of disease risk probability and disease type on interest in clinic-based versus direct-to-consumer genetic testing services. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 706-714.
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abstract = "The effect of disease-specific cognitions on interest in clinic-based and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing was assessed. Participants (N = 309) responded to an online hypothetical scenario and received genetic testing-related messages that varied by risk probability (25, 50, 75 {\%}) and disease type (Alzheimer’s disease vs. Type 2 Diabetes). Post-manipulation interest increased for both testing types, but was greater for clinic-based testing. Interest was greater for Type 2 Diabetes than for Alzheimer’s disease, the latter perceived as more severe and likely, and less treatable and preventable. For DTC testing only, participants allocated to the high risk condition (75 {\%}) had greater testing interest than those in the low (25 {\%}) category. DTC testing is perceived as a viable, but less preferred, option compared with clinic-based testing. Particularly when considering DTC genetic testing, there is a need to emphasize subjective disease-related perceptions, including risk probability.",
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The effect of disease risk probability and disease type on interest in clinic-based versus direct-to-consumer genetic testing services. / Sherman, Kerry; Shaw, Laura Kate; Champion, Katrina; Caldeira, Fernanda; McCaskill, Margaret.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 5, 21.10.2015, p. 706-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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