The effect of distraction on the word memory test and test of memory malingering performance in patients with a severe brain injury

Kellie Batt, E. Arthur Shores*, Eugene Chekaluk

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This research compares the performance of a sample of non-litigating participants with severe brain injury on both the WMT and TOMM under conditions of (1) full effort, (2) distraction, or (3) simulated malingering. The study included 60 participants with a severe brain injury and used restricted randomization to assign participants to the groups. Following Craik (1982) an auditory distraction task was used during the learning phase of each test in the distraction group, while a scenario adapted from Tombaugh (1997) was used to encourage simulation of memory impairment in the simulated malingering group. The results of this study clearly showed that while both tests demonstrated excellent sensitivity, the false positive rates for the WMT were significantly greater than those for the TOMM. It was concluded that the so-called "effort" components of the WMT required more cognitive capacity than was previously believed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1074-1080
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
    Volume14
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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