The effect of the position of atypical character-to-sound correspondences on reading kanji words aloud

evidence for a sublexical serially operating kanji reading process

Ami Sambai*, Max Coltheart, Akira Uno

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In English, the size of the regularity effect on word reading-aloud latency decreases across position of irregularity. This has been explained by a sublexical serially operating reading mechanism. It is unclear whether sublexical serial processing occurs in reading two-character kanji words aloud. To investigate this issue, we studied how the position of atypical character-to-sound correspondences influenced reading performance. When participants read inconsistent-atypical words aloud mixed randomly with nonwords, reading latencies of words with an inconsistent-atypical correspondence in the initial position were significantly longer than words with an inconsistent-atypical correspondence in the second position. The significant difference of reading latencies for inconsistent-atypical words disappeared when inconsistent-atypical words were presented without nonwords. Moreover, reading latencies for words with an inconsistent-atypical correspondence in the first position were shorter than for words with a typical correspondence in the first position. This typicality effect was absent when the atypicality was in the second position. These position-of-atypicality effects suggest that sublexical processing of kanji occurs serially and that the phonology of two-character kanji words is generated from both a lexical parallel process and a sublexical serial process.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)498–513
    Number of pages16
    JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
    Volume25
    Issue number2
    Early online date5 Feb 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

    Keywords

    • sublexical serial processing
    • kanji reading
    • position of atypicality effect

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