The Effects of an aided augmentative system on communication and speech in a preschool child with developmental delay: a case study

Mark Carter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The effect of an aided graphic augmentative communication system on communication and speech in a 4‐year 7‐month‐old child with developmental delay was‐evaluated in this case study. An alternating treatment design was used across 2 mealtime settings (morning tea and lunch) over a 6‐week period with counterbalancing of aided and unaided conditions. Once graphic symbol use emerged, there were slightly higher levels of unprompted communication and requests in the aided condition and a lower proportion of acts contained nonsymbolic communication. There was also a higher number of different words + symbols used in the aided condition. The introduction of the graphic symbols did not appear to have detrimental effects on speech but there was no evidence of sustained increase in frequency of speech or spoken vocabulary in the aided condition. Substantial increases were noted in the number of unprompted communicative turns and range of total vocabulary over the course of the study in both conditions. The need for further research on the effects of AAC on speech and communication in preschool children is highlighted.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-46
    Number of pages22
    JournalAustralasian Journal of Special Education
    Volume23
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

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