The effects of breathing rate and pCO2 levels on relaxation and anxiety in a non-clinical population

Andrew R. Eisen*, Ronald M. Rapee, David H. Barlow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

End-tidal pCO2 levels were manipulated via presentation of two five minute meditation tapes differing in their instructions on rate of respiration (slow breathing = 10 breaths/minute, rapid breathing = 20 breaths/minute). The aim was to assess the effects of this manipulation on relaxation and anxiety in a non-clinical population under resting conditions and during a mild stressor (cold pressor test). Slowed respiration (and pCO2augmentation) were associated with anxiety reduction and increased relaxation for both psychological and psychophysiological indices but this was not enough to counteract the effects of the cold pressor test. Implications for treatment of anxiety disorders are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-190
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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