The effects of cleric statements on suicide bombings in Pakistan, 2000–2010

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between suicide bombings and public cleric statements in Pakistan between 2000–2010. It establishes that bombings and statements increase over time, that cleric statements vary according to the bombing target, and that police and military targets most frequently garner clerics’ attention. An adaptation of Kaplan, Mintz, and Mishal's (2006) maximum likelihood estimation method determines whether cleric statements affect the bombing rate. The analysis shows that pro-suicide statements have a far greater effect on the bombing rate than anti-suicide statements, both in the magnitude of increased bombings and by the length of time over which they exert influence.
LanguageEnglish
Pages219-234
Number of pages16
JournalStudies in Conflict and Terrorism
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bombing
suicide
Pakistan
Maximum likelihood estimation
Law enforcement
police
Military

Cite this

@article{cbe52c7ca03f4109845cba0483611680,
title = "The effects of cleric statements on suicide bombings in Pakistan, 2000–2010",
abstract = "This article explores the relationship between suicide bombings and public cleric statements in Pakistan between 2000–2010. It establishes that bombings and statements increase over time, that cleric statements vary according to the bombing target, and that police and military targets most frequently garner clerics’ attention. An adaptation of Kaplan, Mintz, and Mishal's (2006) maximum likelihood estimation method determines whether cleric statements affect the bombing rate. The analysis shows that pro-suicide statements have a far greater effect on the bombing rate than anti-suicide statements, both in the magnitude of increased bombings and by the length of time over which they exert influence.",
author = "Nolan, {Bridget Rose}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/1057610X.2013.755913",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "219--234",
journal = "Studies in Conflict and Terrorism",
issn = "1057-610X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "3",

}

The effects of cleric statements on suicide bombings in Pakistan, 2000–2010. / Nolan, Bridget Rose.

In: Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Vol. 36, No. 3, 2013, p. 219-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of cleric statements on suicide bombings in Pakistan, 2000–2010

AU - Nolan, Bridget Rose

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This article explores the relationship between suicide bombings and public cleric statements in Pakistan between 2000–2010. It establishes that bombings and statements increase over time, that cleric statements vary according to the bombing target, and that police and military targets most frequently garner clerics’ attention. An adaptation of Kaplan, Mintz, and Mishal's (2006) maximum likelihood estimation method determines whether cleric statements affect the bombing rate. The analysis shows that pro-suicide statements have a far greater effect on the bombing rate than anti-suicide statements, both in the magnitude of increased bombings and by the length of time over which they exert influence.

AB - This article explores the relationship between suicide bombings and public cleric statements in Pakistan between 2000–2010. It establishes that bombings and statements increase over time, that cleric statements vary according to the bombing target, and that police and military targets most frequently garner clerics’ attention. An adaptation of Kaplan, Mintz, and Mishal's (2006) maximum likelihood estimation method determines whether cleric statements affect the bombing rate. The analysis shows that pro-suicide statements have a far greater effect on the bombing rate than anti-suicide statements, both in the magnitude of increased bombings and by the length of time over which they exert influence.

U2 - 10.1080/1057610X.2013.755913

DO - 10.1080/1057610X.2013.755913

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 219

EP - 234

JO - Studies in Conflict and Terrorism

T2 - Studies in Conflict and Terrorism

JF - Studies in Conflict and Terrorism

SN - 1057-610X

IS - 3

ER -