The effects of educational interventions on pharmacists’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards low back pain

Christina Abdel Shaheed, Christopher G. Maher, Wendy Mak, Kylie A. Williams, Andrew J. McLachlan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Practitioner beliefs and attitudes towards low back pain (LBP) influence treatment decisions. Little is known about pharmacists’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards LBP. Objectives To investigate the effect of educational interventions on pharmacists’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards LBP. Setting Sydney Metropolitan Area. Methods Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs was measured using the “Pharmacists’ Back Beliefs Questionnaire”, with items from two previously reported questionnaires on back beliefs. Responses from pharmacists attending a 2-h educational workshop on LBP (n = 204) and pharmacists recruiting participants for a LBP clinical trial (n = 66) were compared to responses from a control group of pharmacists (n = 65) to allow an evaluation of the two interventions. Responses from workshop participants were also evaluated before and after the session. Participants indicated their agreement with statements about LBP on a 5-point Likert scale. Preferred responses were based on guidelines for the evidence-based management of LBP. The primary analysis evaluated total score on the nine-inevitability items of the Back Beliefs Questionnaire (“inevitability score”). Main outcome measure Inevitability score. Results There was no significant difference in inevitability score between LBP clinical trial pharmacists and the control group [mean difference (MD) 0.47 (95 % CI −1.35 to 2.29; p = 0.61)]. The educational workshop led to a significant and favourable change in inevitability score (MD 7.23 p < 0.001) and notable changes in responses to misconceptions regarding bed rest and the need for imaging (p < 0.001) among participating pharmacists. Conclusions Pharmacists attending the educational workshop provided the most compelling evidence that education specifically aimed at delivering evidence-based information can be successful in changing practitioner knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards LBP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)616-625
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Community pharmacy
  • Education
  • Evidence-based management
  • Low back pain

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of educational interventions on pharmacists’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards low back pain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this