The effects of exposure to psychological violence in the workplace on commitment and turnover intentions

the moderating role of social support and role stressors

François Courcy*, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Isabelle Madore

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Exposure to workplace violence has been identified as a serious and universal issue facing modern organizations. The present study focuses more specifically on exposure to psychological violence, and its association with turnover intentions as mediated by workplace affective commitment. In addition, we also explore the moderating role of various facets of job demands (role stressors) and resources (social support) on the aforementioned relations. Data collected from 1,228 university employees indicated that experiencing psychological violence at work was associated with lower levels of workplace affective commitment and higher levels of turnover intentions, and that the relation between psychological violence and turnover intentions was partially mediated by commitment. Furthermore, role stressors and social support were found to moderate the negative relation between exposure to psychological violence and workplace affective commitment, as well as between commitment and turnover intentions, but not the direct relation between psychological violence and turnover intentions. Theoretical and research implications for the literature on psychological violence and practical suggestions for minimizing its damaging consequences are proposed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)4162-4190
    Number of pages29
    JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
    Volume34
    Issue number19
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

    Keywords

    • psychological violence
    • turnover intentions
    • commitment
    • role stressors
    • social support

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