The effects of impulsivity and proactive inhibition on reactive inhibition and the go process

Leidy Castro-Meneses, Paul Sowman

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

This study measured proactive and reactive response inhibition and their relationships with self-reported impulsivity. We examined the domains of both vocal and manual responding using a stop signal task (SST) with two stop probabilities: high and low probability stop (1/3 and 1/6 stops respectively). Our aim was to evaluate the effect stop probability would have on reactive and proactive inhibition. We tested 44 subjects and found that for the high compared to low probability stop signal condition, more proactive inhibition was evident and this was correlated with a reduction in reactive inhibition, as measured by the stop signal reaction time (SSRT). We also found that reactive inhibition had a positive relationship with dysfunctional but not functional impulsivity in both vocal and manual domains of responding. In other words, people with high dysfunctional levels of impulsivity took longer time to stop a vocal and a manual response. These results suggest that people with high dysfunctional levels of impulsivity may be able to stop faster (i.e. to reduce the SSRT) if they increase proactive inhibition. A neuro-training program has been proposed to test this idea.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jun 2016
Event 22nd World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression (ISRA) - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 19 Jul 201623 Jul 2016

Conference

Conference 22nd World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression (ISRA)
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period19/07/1623/07/16

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    Castro-Meneses, L., & Sowman, P. (2016). The effects of impulsivity and proactive inhibition on reactive inhibition and the go process. Poster session presented at 22nd World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression (ISRA), Sydney, Australia.