The efficacy of self-management programmes for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury (ABI): A systematic review

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Abstract

Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI), often arising from stroke or trauma, is a common cause of long-term disability, physical inactivity and poor health outcomes globally. Individuals with ABI face many barriers to increasing physical activity, such as impaired mobility, access to services and knowledge regarding management of physical activity. Self-management programmes aim to build skills to enable an individual to manage their condition, including their physical activity levels, over a long period of time. Programme delivery modes can include traditional face-to-face methods, or remote delivery, such as via the Internet. However, it is unknown how effective these programmes are at specifically improving physical activity in community-dwelling adults with ABI, or how effective and acceptable remote delivery of self-management programmes is for this population. Methods/Design: We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) databases that assess the efficacy of a self-management intervention, which aims to enhance levels of physical activity in adults living in the community with ABI. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias, and extract relevant data. Where possible, a meta-analysis will be performed to calculate the overall effect size of self-management interventions on physical activity levels and on outcomes associated with physical activity. A comparison will also be made between face-to-face and remote delivery modes of self-management programmes, in order to examine efficacy and acceptability. A content analysis of self-management programmes will also be conducted to compare aspects of the intervention that are associated with more favourable outcomes. Discussion: This systematic review aims to review the efficacy of self-management programmes aimed at increasing physical activity levels in adults living in the community with ABI, and the efficacy and acceptability of remote delivery of these programmes. If effective, remote delivery of self-management programmes may offer an alternative way to overcome barriers and empower individuals with ABI to increase their levels of physical activity, improving health and general wellbeing. Trial registration: Our protocol has been registered on PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013006748.

LanguageEnglish
Article number39
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
JournalSystematic Reviews
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2014

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Independent Living
Self Care
Brain Injuries
Knowledge Management
Population Control
Health
MEDLINE
Internet
Meta-Analysis
Stroke
Databases
Wounds and Injuries

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this

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title = "The efficacy of self-management programmes for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury (ABI): A systematic review",
abstract = "Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI), often arising from stroke or trauma, is a common cause of long-term disability, physical inactivity and poor health outcomes globally. Individuals with ABI face many barriers to increasing physical activity, such as impaired mobility, access to services and knowledge regarding management of physical activity. Self-management programmes aim to build skills to enable an individual to manage their condition, including their physical activity levels, over a long period of time. Programme delivery modes can include traditional face-to-face methods, or remote delivery, such as via the Internet. However, it is unknown how effective these programmes are at specifically improving physical activity in community-dwelling adults with ABI, or how effective and acceptable remote delivery of self-management programmes is for this population. Methods/Design: We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) databases that assess the efficacy of a self-management intervention, which aims to enhance levels of physical activity in adults living in the community with ABI. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias, and extract relevant data. Where possible, a meta-analysis will be performed to calculate the overall effect size of self-management interventions on physical activity levels and on outcomes associated with physical activity. A comparison will also be made between face-to-face and remote delivery modes of self-management programmes, in order to examine efficacy and acceptability. A content analysis of self-management programmes will also be conducted to compare aspects of the intervention that are associated with more favourable outcomes. Discussion: This systematic review aims to review the efficacy of self-management programmes aimed at increasing physical activity levels in adults living in the community with ABI, and the efficacy and acceptability of remote delivery of these programmes. If effective, remote delivery of self-management programmes may offer an alternative way to overcome barriers and empower individuals with ABI to increase their levels of physical activity, improving health and general wellbeing. Trial registration: Our protocol has been registered on PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013006748.",
author = "Jones, {Taryn M.} and Hush, {Julia M.} and Dear, {Blake F.} and Nickolai Titov and Dean, {Catherine M.}",
note = "Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.",
year = "2014",
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T1 - The efficacy of self-management programmes for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury (ABI)

T2 - Systematic Reviews

AU - Jones, Taryn M.

AU - Hush, Julia M.

AU - Dear, Blake F.

AU - Titov, Nickolai

AU - Dean, Catherine M.

N1 - Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

PY - 2014/4/21

Y1 - 2014/4/21

N2 - Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI), often arising from stroke or trauma, is a common cause of long-term disability, physical inactivity and poor health outcomes globally. Individuals with ABI face many barriers to increasing physical activity, such as impaired mobility, access to services and knowledge regarding management of physical activity. Self-management programmes aim to build skills to enable an individual to manage their condition, including their physical activity levels, over a long period of time. Programme delivery modes can include traditional face-to-face methods, or remote delivery, such as via the Internet. However, it is unknown how effective these programmes are at specifically improving physical activity in community-dwelling adults with ABI, or how effective and acceptable remote delivery of self-management programmes is for this population. Methods/Design: We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) databases that assess the efficacy of a self-management intervention, which aims to enhance levels of physical activity in adults living in the community with ABI. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias, and extract relevant data. Where possible, a meta-analysis will be performed to calculate the overall effect size of self-management interventions on physical activity levels and on outcomes associated with physical activity. A comparison will also be made between face-to-face and remote delivery modes of self-management programmes, in order to examine efficacy and acceptability. A content analysis of self-management programmes will also be conducted to compare aspects of the intervention that are associated with more favourable outcomes. Discussion: This systematic review aims to review the efficacy of self-management programmes aimed at increasing physical activity levels in adults living in the community with ABI, and the efficacy and acceptability of remote delivery of these programmes. If effective, remote delivery of self-management programmes may offer an alternative way to overcome barriers and empower individuals with ABI to increase their levels of physical activity, improving health and general wellbeing. Trial registration: Our protocol has been registered on PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013006748.

AB - Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI), often arising from stroke or trauma, is a common cause of long-term disability, physical inactivity and poor health outcomes globally. Individuals with ABI face many barriers to increasing physical activity, such as impaired mobility, access to services and knowledge regarding management of physical activity. Self-management programmes aim to build skills to enable an individual to manage their condition, including their physical activity levels, over a long period of time. Programme delivery modes can include traditional face-to-face methods, or remote delivery, such as via the Internet. However, it is unknown how effective these programmes are at specifically improving physical activity in community-dwelling adults with ABI, or how effective and acceptable remote delivery of self-management programmes is for this population. Methods/Design: We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) databases that assess the efficacy of a self-management intervention, which aims to enhance levels of physical activity in adults living in the community with ABI. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias, and extract relevant data. Where possible, a meta-analysis will be performed to calculate the overall effect size of self-management interventions on physical activity levels and on outcomes associated with physical activity. A comparison will also be made between face-to-face and remote delivery modes of self-management programmes, in order to examine efficacy and acceptability. A content analysis of self-management programmes will also be conducted to compare aspects of the intervention that are associated with more favourable outcomes. Discussion: This systematic review aims to review the efficacy of self-management programmes aimed at increasing physical activity levels in adults living in the community with ABI, and the efficacy and acceptability of remote delivery of these programmes. If effective, remote delivery of self-management programmes may offer an alternative way to overcome barriers and empower individuals with ABI to increase their levels of physical activity, improving health and general wellbeing. Trial registration: Our protocol has been registered on PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013006748.

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