The efficacy of the mind switch environmental control system for the severely disabled

Ashley Craig, Yvonne Tran, Paul McIsaac

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

People living with a severe disability suffer substantial personal and social consequences that reduce quality of life (QOL). One potential negative impact on the QOL of a disabled person is the loss of the ability to control devices in their immediate environment (such as the television, computer, telephones, lights, doors, etc.). Consequently, research and development has been conducted on technology designed to restore independence by providing some means of control over these devices. Technology that allows a severely disabled person to gain this type of control has been called an environmental control system (ECS). The aim of this paper is to present evidence for the efficacy of a novel "hands free" system based on control of brain wave activity, called the Mind Switch environmental control system (MSECS). The MSECS was shown to be effective with both able bodied and severely disabled populations. Challenges still exist before the MSECS technology can provide highly reliable and user-friendly device control.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication41st Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2005
Subtitle of host publicationTechnology Improving Performance, HFESA 2005
EditorsRebecca Mitchell
Pages87-93
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event41st Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2005: Technology Improving Performance, HFESA 2005 - Canberra, ACT, Australia
Duration: 21 Nov 200523 Nov 2005

Conference

Conference41st Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2005: Technology Improving Performance, HFESA 2005
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra, ACT
Period21/11/0523/11/05

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  • Cite this

    Craig, A., Tran, Y., & McIsaac, P. (2005). The efficacy of the mind switch environmental control system for the severely disabled. In R. Mitchell (Ed.), 41st Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2005: Technology Improving Performance, HFESA 2005 (pp. 87-93)