The embryologic basis for the anatomy of the cerebral vasculature related to arteriovenous malformations

Andrew S. Davidson, M. K. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A detailed understanding of vascular anatomy is essential to facilitate appropriate decision-making by clinicians responsible for treating arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of the brain and dura. This work reviews the embryologic development of the cerebral vasculature, including the dural venous sinuses, with a focus on the relevant angioarchitecture. There is little doubt that dural AVM are acquired lesions; however, conflicting evidence exists regarding the pathophysiology of brain AVM. Patients described in this review provide support for both of the proposed mechanisms for the development of brain AVM (post-natal development compared to embryologic origin). Further work is required to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of these lesions.

LanguageEnglish
Pages464-469
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

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Arteriovenous Malformations
Anatomy
Brain
Blood Vessels
Decision Making

Cite this

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The embryologic basis for the anatomy of the cerebral vasculature related to arteriovenous malformations. / Davidson, Andrew S.; Morgan, M. K.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 18, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 464-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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