The face you recognize may not be the one you saw

Memory conjunction errors in individuals with or without learning disability

Henrik Danielsson*, Jerker Rönnberg, Anna Leven, Jan Andersson, Karin Andersson, Björn Lyxell

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Memory conjunction errors, that is, when a combination of two previously presented stimuli is erroneously recognized as previously having been seen, were investigated in a face recognition task with drawings and photographs in 23 individuals with learning disability, and 18 chronologically age-matched controls without learning disability. Compared to the controls, individuals with learning disability committed significantly more conjunction errors, feature errors (one old and one new component), but had lower correct recognition, when the results were adjusted for different guessing levels. A dual-processing approach gained more support than a binding approach. However, neither of the approaches could explain all of the results. The results of the learning disability group were only partly related to non-verbal intelligence.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)177-186
    Number of pages10
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
    Volume47
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

    Keywords

    • Face recognition
    • Learning disability
    • Memory conjunction errors

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