The impact of alcohol pharmacotherapies on public health in Australia is limited by low prescribing rates

Paul S. Haber*, Kirsten C. Morley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/opinionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Alcohol use disorders are among the most common and disabling problems in Australia. A number of pharmacotherapies available in Australia have been shown to be effective and are subsidised through the Australian Government's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. The uptake of these medicines is poor, and the majority of those who start treatment do not complete the recommended course. Use of these medicines is significantly lower in regions that are disadvantaged or remote, and in patients who are younger. Taken together, these factors limit the potential benefit to population health from treatment of alcohol use disorders. Barriers to treatment have been identified at the level of the patient, the provider, the medicine and the healthcare system. An integrated strategy may be required to overcome these barriers.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2641643
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalPublic Health Research and Practice
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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