The Impact of workplace practices on business profitability in New Zealand

Ray Markey, Boaz Shulruf

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

This study identifies the effects of a bundle of workplace practices on business profitability in New Zealand, analysing data from the Business Operations Survey 2006. Results suggest that workplace practices explain 4.8%-24.4% of variance in business profitability. Employer-employee collaborative workplace practices increase business profitability. Flexible job arrangements based on employer-employee collaboration have positive effect on business profitability but the effect is negative when decisions regarding work arrangements are made unilaterally. Workplace training has positive effect on business profitability in some industries, but this decreases when more than 50% of employees participate. Non-performance based pay is the preferreable pay arrangement to increase business profitability. Union and collective bargaining coverage do not affect business profitability. Implications for policy makers are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 22nd ANZAM Conference
Subtitle of host publicationmanaging in the Pacific century
Place of PublicationAuckland
PublisherPromaco Conventions
Pages1-19
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)1863081488
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventAustralian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (22nd : 2008) - Auckland, New Zealand
Duration: 2 Dec 20085 Dec 2008

Conference

ConferenceAustralian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (22nd : 2008)
CountryNew Zealand
CityAuckland
Period2/12/085/12/08

Keywords

  • human resource management and organisational performance
  • employee relations
  • performance management
  • human resource development
  • employee involvement
  • voice

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