The importance of adopting a client focus in assessing outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation treatment of older people

Lindsay Gething, Judith Fethney*, Angela Blazely

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To explore quality of life for older people at hospital discharge and in the three months following discharge and to assess the impact of independence measured in terms of function, ability and perceived confidence in carrying out daily tasks. Method A questionnaire battery was administered through interview on three occasions. Thirty seven people participated in Interview 1, twenty-three in Interview 2 and twenty in Interview 3. Eighteen people completed all three interviews. Results: Respondents initially reported an objective quality of life comparable with other samples of older Australians, but this decreased significantly within the study group over the interview period. Subjective quality of life also was initially reported as similar to that found for a comparably-aged group, but decreased significantly one month following hospital discharge. The only functional measure found to be related to quality of life was confidence in carrying out daily activities. Conclusion: These findings highlight the importance of an holistic approach to assessing treatment outcomes which incorporates the views of clients as well as those of professionals. The article closes with recommendations designed to maximise health management outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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