The importance of brain banks for molecular neuropathological research: the New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre experience

Irina Dedova*, Antony Harding, Donna Sheedy, Therese Garrick, Nina Sundqvist, Clare Hunt, Juliette Gillies, Clive G. Harper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

New developments in molecular neuropathology have evoked increased demands for postmortem human brain tissue. The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre (TRC) at The University of Sydney has grown from a small tissue collection into one of the leading international brain banking facilities, which operates with best practice and quality control protocols. The focus of this tissue collection is on schizophrenia and allied disorders, alcohol use disorders and controls. This review highlights changes in TRC operational procedures dictated by modern neuroscience, and provides examples of applications of modern molecular techniques to study the neuropathogenesis of many different brain disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)366-384
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2009. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Brain bank
  • Clinical characterization
  • Genome
  • Human
  • Molecular neuropathology
  • Postmortem
  • Proteome
  • Receptor binding
  • Schizophrenia

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