The incidence and cost of hospitalisation of children with injuries from playground equipment falls in New South Wales, Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aims: To describe the epidemiological profile and cost of hospitalised injuries caused by playground equipment falls of children aged 0–14 years, in New South Wales, Australia.

Methods: Linked New South Wales hospitalisation data from 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2014 were used to describe the incidence of hospitalisation for playground falls, the age‐standardised rate of hospitalisation per year, age group and gender, the characteristics of the injured children and the injury incident. Health outcomes, such as length of stay in hospital, and the hospital costs associated with the injuries were examined by age group. Negative binomial regression assessed the trend in hospitalisation rates over time.

Results: There were 7795 hospitalisations of children for playground fall injuries. The highest hospitalisation rate was for the 5–9 year olds (220.7 per 100 000 population) and was higher in males than females (234.2 and 206.3 per 100 000 population, respectively). The majority of these injuries occurred in schools (17.1%) and homes (14.6%), and were as a result of falls from trampolines (34.3%) and climbing apparatuses (28.2%). Over half the playground falls led to fractures of the elbow and wrist (54.7%). The total hospital cost of playground fall‐related injuries was $18 million.

Conclusion: Rates of hospitalisation of children for playground fall injuries remain high despite implementation of national playground safety standards in Australia. This research highlights where interventions should be targeted to reduce the incidence and burden of injuries following falls from playground equipment.
LanguageEnglish
Pages556-562
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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South Australia
New South Wales
Hospitalization
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Costs
Age Groups
Elbow
Wrist
Population
Length of Stay
Safety
Health
Research

Keywords

  • children
  • hospitalisation
  • linked data
  • playground falls

Cite this

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title = "The incidence and cost of hospitalisation of children with injuries from playground equipment falls in New South Wales, Australia",
abstract = "Aims: To describe the epidemiological profile and cost of hospitalised injuries caused by playground equipment falls of children aged 0–14 years, in New South Wales, Australia.Methods: Linked New South Wales hospitalisation data from 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2014 were used to describe the incidence of hospitalisation for playground falls, the age‐standardised rate of hospitalisation per year, age group and gender, the characteristics of the injured children and the injury incident. Health outcomes, such as length of stay in hospital, and the hospital costs associated with the injuries were examined by age group. Negative binomial regression assessed the trend in hospitalisation rates over time.Results: There were 7795 hospitalisations of children for playground fall injuries. The highest hospitalisation rate was for the 5–9 year olds (220.7 per 100 000 population) and was higher in males than females (234.2 and 206.3 per 100 000 population, respectively). The majority of these injuries occurred in schools (17.1{\%}) and homes (14.6{\%}), and were as a result of falls from trampolines (34.3{\%}) and climbing apparatuses (28.2{\%}). Over half the playground falls led to fractures of the elbow and wrist (54.7{\%}). The total hospital cost of playground fall‐related injuries was $18 million.Conclusion: Rates of hospitalisation of children for playground fall injuries remain high despite implementation of national playground safety standards in Australia. This research highlights where interventions should be targeted to reduce the incidence and burden of injuries following falls from playground equipment.",
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The incidence and cost of hospitalisation of children with injuries from playground equipment falls in New South Wales, Australia. / Bierbaum, Mia; Curtis, Kate; Mitchell, Rebecca.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 54, No. 5, 2018, p. 556-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Aims: To describe the epidemiological profile and cost of hospitalised injuries caused by playground equipment falls of children aged 0–14 years, in New South Wales, Australia.Methods: Linked New South Wales hospitalisation data from 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2014 were used to describe the incidence of hospitalisation for playground falls, the age‐standardised rate of hospitalisation per year, age group and gender, the characteristics of the injured children and the injury incident. Health outcomes, such as length of stay in hospital, and the hospital costs associated with the injuries were examined by age group. Negative binomial regression assessed the trend in hospitalisation rates over time.Results: There were 7795 hospitalisations of children for playground fall injuries. The highest hospitalisation rate was for the 5–9 year olds (220.7 per 100 000 population) and was higher in males than females (234.2 and 206.3 per 100 000 population, respectively). The majority of these injuries occurred in schools (17.1%) and homes (14.6%), and were as a result of falls from trampolines (34.3%) and climbing apparatuses (28.2%). Over half the playground falls led to fractures of the elbow and wrist (54.7%). The total hospital cost of playground fall‐related injuries was $18 million.Conclusion: Rates of hospitalisation of children for playground fall injuries remain high despite implementation of national playground safety standards in Australia. This research highlights where interventions should be targeted to reduce the incidence and burden of injuries following falls from playground equipment.

AB - Aims: To describe the epidemiological profile and cost of hospitalised injuries caused by playground equipment falls of children aged 0–14 years, in New South Wales, Australia.Methods: Linked New South Wales hospitalisation data from 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2014 were used to describe the incidence of hospitalisation for playground falls, the age‐standardised rate of hospitalisation per year, age group and gender, the characteristics of the injured children and the injury incident. Health outcomes, such as length of stay in hospital, and the hospital costs associated with the injuries were examined by age group. Negative binomial regression assessed the trend in hospitalisation rates over time.Results: There were 7795 hospitalisations of children for playground fall injuries. The highest hospitalisation rate was for the 5–9 year olds (220.7 per 100 000 population) and was higher in males than females (234.2 and 206.3 per 100 000 population, respectively). The majority of these injuries occurred in schools (17.1%) and homes (14.6%), and were as a result of falls from trampolines (34.3%) and climbing apparatuses (28.2%). Over half the playground falls led to fractures of the elbow and wrist (54.7%). The total hospital cost of playground fall‐related injuries was $18 million.Conclusion: Rates of hospitalisation of children for playground fall injuries remain high despite implementation of national playground safety standards in Australia. This research highlights where interventions should be targeted to reduce the incidence and burden of injuries following falls from playground equipment.

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