The Influence of context and personality on judgments of university accounting students relating to consolidated financial reporting

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

Purpose: This paper examines International Accounting Standard 27 (IAS 27) ‘Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements’, which contained one of the most important and controversial issue. The essential consolidation criterion, namely, one entity’s ‘control’ over another entity is consistently defined as “the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an entity so as to obtain benefits from its activities”. The objective of this study is to empirically examine the influence of contextual factor relating to financial performance of associated entity and personality variable on the basis of regulatory focus theory on judgments of accounting students in an Australian university relating to the consolidation criterion. This research question has been addressed by a 2 x 2 between-subject quasi-experimental research instrument. This study provides empirical evidence that context and personality are important in influencing judgments of accounting students in interpreting and applying the consolidation criterion contained in IFRS. Practical and Social implications: This study has significant implications for the ongoing international accounting convergence with particular reference to enhancing the comparability of consolidated financial reporting across countries. The results also have implications for improving learning and teaching of accounting to university students.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73
Number of pages1
JournalExpo 2011 Higher Degree Research : book of abstracts
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventHigher Degree Research Expo (7th : 2011) - Sydney
Duration: 10 Oct 201111 Oct 2011

Keywords

  • globalization
  • international convergence
  • culture
  • personality
  • consolidated financial reporting

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Influence of context and personality on judgments of university accounting students relating to consolidated financial reporting'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this