The influence of Tucetona laticostata (Bivalvia: Glycymeridae) shells and rhodolith patches on benthic-invertebrate assemblages in Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand

S. E. A. Dewas, S. O'Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The large dog cockle, Tucetona laticostata (Quoy and Gaimard, 1835), is widely but sporadically distributed throughout coastal waters of Hauraki Gulf. One location at which this species proves common is around Otata Island, one of a series of islands in the Noises complex in Hauraki Gulf, where it resides partially buried in gravel and rhodoliths in shallow water, at 5-15 m depth. The shells of T. laticostata collect in large post-mortem deposits in an area ramping from the sea bed off southwestern Otata Island. Seasonal variation in and benthic macroinvertebrate composition of taxon assemblages within and outside T. laticostata/rhodolith mounds and gravel are described. Both benthic invertebrate mean taxon richness and abundance within T. laticostata/rhodolith habitat are higher than in gravel; spatial and temporal variation in these communities is reported. Anthropogenic threats to structurally complex T. laticostata shell and rhodolith-based biogenic substrata are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-56
Number of pages10
JournalNew Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • benthic invertebrates
  • Hauraki Gulf
  • rhodoliths
  • species diversity
  • Tucetona laticostata

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