The influence of naturally mapped control interfaces for video games on the player experience and intuitive interaction

Research output: ThesisMaster (Research) Thesis

Abstract

This thesis empirically explores the influence of different types of naturally mapped control interfaces (NMCIs) for video games on the player experience and intuitive interaction. Across two repeated-measures experiments on racing and tennis games, more naturally mapped controls were shown to have largely positive effects, with some differences associated with player characteristics. The compensatory effects of natural mapping for casual players are revealed, along with some aversion to NMCIs amongst hardcore players. Overall implications are discussed, and a new NMCI Dimensions Framework presented, to aid future academic and design work leveraging NMCIs to improve video game accessibility and experiences.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Queensland University of Technology
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Johnson, Daniel, Supervisor, External person
  • Blackler, Alethea, Supervisor, External person
  • Wyeth, Peta, Supervisor, External person
Award date14 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Computer Games
  • Control Interfaces
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Intuitive Interaction
  • Motion Controls
  • Natural Mapping
  • Player Characteristics
  • Player Experience
  • Tangible User Interfaces
  • Video Games

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