The Integration paradox: Asian immigrants in Australia and the United States

Van Tran*, Fei Guo, Tiffany Huang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas Australia has pursued a skills-based migration policy, the United States has privileged family-based migration. The key contrast between these migration regimes provides a rare test of how national immigration policy shapes immigrant selection and integration. Does a skills-based immigration regime result in a more select group of Asian immigrants in Australia compared to their counterparts in the United States? Are Asian immigrants more integrated into their host society in Australia compared to the United States? Focusing on four groups of Asian immigrants in both countries (Chinese, Indians, Filipinos, and Vietnamese), this article addresses these questions using a transpacific comparison. Despite Australia’s skills-based immigration policy, we find that Asian immigrants in Australia are less hyper-selected than their counterparts in the United States. Asian immigrants in Australia also report worse labor market outcomes than those in the United States, with the exception of Vietnamese—a refugee group. Altogether, these findings challenge the conventional wisdom that skills-based immigration policy not only results in more selected immigrants, but also positively influences their integration into the host society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-60
Number of pages25
JournalThe Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume690
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • skills-based migration
  • family-based migration
  • Asian immigrants
  • transpacific comparison
  • hyper-selectivity
  • labor market integration

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