The interpretation of negative social events in social phobia with versus without comorbid mood disorder

Judith K. Wilson, Ronald M. Rapee*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    49 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Two studies were conducted in order to examine biases in the interpretation of negative social events among socially anxious individuals. Results showed that social anxiety was associated with the tendency to believe that negative social events: would result in negative evaluation by other people; were actually indicative of negative personal characteristics; and would have adverse consequences in the long-term future. Although other types of anxiety were not independently associated with such beliefs, comorbid depression among individuals with social phobia was associated with further increases in these interpretative biases. The findings are consistent with theories suggesting that maladaptive interpretations of negative social events represent central cognitive biases in social phobia, but suggest that these interpretations are also associated with depression.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)245-274
    Number of pages30
    JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
    Volume19
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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