The MUCHE Health Report 2019: Analysis of the 2019-20 Federal Budget

Research output: Book/ReportOther reportResearch

Abstract

While some have labelled this a cash splash Budget, health portfolio expenditure has been shackled. This fits within a recent trend of ever lower annual expenditure growth since 2016-17.
There will be a 2 per cent increase in real expenditure from 2019-20 to 2022-23. Most of this growth comes in the last two years of Budget projections. Australians face a reduction in per capita health portfolio expenditure over the next two years.
This is a grass roots Health portfolio budget, with the Australian Government looking to garner approval from local communities. It has allocated funding to several individual infrastructure projects, health programs and not-for-profit groups.
The centrepiece Budget item is the $1.1 billion allocated over five years to support primary care. Aged care was allocated $724.8 million over the next five years for residential care and Home Care packages, but most of this funding was already announced.
This Budget continues to implement the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan, allocating funds to after-hours mental health treatment centres, and to reduce our alarming youth suicide rate.
The Australian Government has missed an opportunity to tackle some pressing healthcare issues associated with obesity, public hospital waiting lists, and high out-of-pocket costs.
To find out how the Budget could affect health and human services, click on the link below. There you can view or download our report, which summarises the context and key changes in: Aged care, Disability, Hospitals, Mental health, Pharmaceuticals, Pharmacy, Primary care and medical services, Private health insurance.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationNorth Ryde, NSW
PublisherMacquarie University, Centre for the Health Economy
Number of pages29
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Budgets
Health Expenditures
Health
Mental Health
Suicide
Primary Health Care
Waiting Lists
Public Hospitals
Financial Management
Health Insurance
Home Care Services
Growth
Poaceae
Health Services
Obesity
Delivery of Health Care
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

Cutler, H., Epp, J., Aghdaee, M., & Partington, A. (2019). The MUCHE Health Report 2019: Analysis of the 2019-20 Federal Budget. North Ryde, NSW: Macquarie University, Centre for the Health Economy.
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Cutler, H, Epp, J, Aghdaee, M & Partington, A 2019, The MUCHE Health Report 2019: Analysis of the 2019-20 Federal Budget. Macquarie University, Centre for the Health Economy, North Ryde, NSW.

The MUCHE Health Report 2019 : Analysis of the 2019-20 Federal Budget. / Cutler, Henry; Epp, Joanne; Aghdaee, Mona; Partington, Andrew.

North Ryde, NSW : Macquarie University, Centre for the Health Economy, 2019. 29 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther reportResearch

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AB - While some have labelled this a cash splash Budget, health portfolio expenditure has been shackled. This fits within a recent trend of ever lower annual expenditure growth since 2016-17.There will be a 2 per cent increase in real expenditure from 2019-20 to 2022-23. Most of this growth comes in the last two years of Budget projections. Australians face a reduction in per capita health portfolio expenditure over the next two years.This is a grass roots Health portfolio budget, with the Australian Government looking to garner approval from local communities. It has allocated funding to several individual infrastructure projects, health programs and not-for-profit groups.The centrepiece Budget item is the $1.1 billion allocated over five years to support primary care. Aged care was allocated $724.8 million over the next five years for residential care and Home Care packages, but most of this funding was already announced.This Budget continues to implement the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan, allocating funds to after-hours mental health treatment centres, and to reduce our alarming youth suicide rate.The Australian Government has missed an opportunity to tackle some pressing healthcare issues associated with obesity, public hospital waiting lists, and high out-of-pocket costs.To find out how the Budget could affect health and human services, click on the link below. There you can view or download our report, which summarises the context and key changes in: Aged care, Disability, Hospitals, Mental health, Pharmaceuticals, Pharmacy, Primary care and medical services, Private health insurance.

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Cutler H, Epp J, Aghdaee M, Partington A. The MUCHE Health Report 2019: Analysis of the 2019-20 Federal Budget. North Ryde, NSW: Macquarie University, Centre for the Health Economy, 2019. 29 p.