The museum of the imagination: curating against the colonial insistence on diminishing Indigeneity

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In delivering a future where Indigenous peoples determine and shape our own paths, what practices resist colonial trappings that narrow representations by creating instead an expansive recall of both past and present realities? This chapter draws on an examination of First Nations representation in museums to understand strategies, pathways and ongoing barriers to promoting the complexity of who Indigenous peoples are, and through a casting of Vizenor's thesis of ‘Indigenous survivance' (1999), who we always will be. While arriving at a conclusion around agency, the chapter concludes by proposing how other sites of cultural consumption—outside of the museum space—resist stereotype by proposing a shared, yet singular disruption that resists and expands.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge handbook of Australian Indigenous peoples and futures
EditorsBronwyn Carlson, Madi Day, Sandy O'Sullivan, Tristan Kennedy
Place of PublicationLondon ; New York
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Group
Chapter23
Pages336-345
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781003271802
ISBN (Print)9781032222530, 9781032222547
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Publication series

NameRoutledge Anthropology Handbooks
PublisherRoutledge

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