The observer effect: can being watched enhance compliance with hand hygiene behaviour? a randomised trial

Patrick Geoffrey Mark Bolton, Ketty Rivas, Veronika Prachar, Michael P. Jones

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Bateson and Shelby provide evidence that cues of being watched can be a powerful mechanism inducing those observed to change behaviour. We designed and conducted a randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of visual cues of being watched on hand hygiene compliance. This did not demonstrate improved hand hygiene compliance associated with cues of being watched: compliance for wards with a 'cleanse your hands' poster was 87.3% and for wards without the poster it was 84.9%. This difference failed to reach statistical significance (OR=1.73, 95% CI 0.71- to 4.24, p=0.23).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)GS14-GS16
    Number of pages3
    JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Health Management
    Volume10
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

    Keywords

    • cues of being watched
    • behaviour change methods
    • hand hygiene compliance

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