The one-eyed king: Positioning Universal Design within learning and teaching at a tertiary institution

Thomas Kerr*, Iain McAlpine, Michael Grant

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper describes the implementation of universal design (UD) principles in a tertiary setting from an educational design perspective. It discusses how those responsible for implementing this relatively new approach to learning design are building a dialogue around UD in education and willing cooperation from staff in the development of its use in course design at the institutional level. The nine principles of UD are described, together with the three principal models that apply UD to learning. An implementation plan, currently in development at a metropolitan university, maps out how the educational development team is building acceptance of UD principles across the campus in the design of all future learning materials.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of ASCILITE 2014 - Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education
    EditorsBronwyn Hegarty, Jenny McDonald, Swee-Kin Loke
    Place of PublicationTugun, Queensland
    PublisherASCILITE
    Pages698-702
    Number of pages5
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event31st Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2014 - Dunedin, New Zealand
    Duration: 23 Nov 201426 Nov 2014

    Other

    Other31st Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2014
    CountryNew Zealand
    CityDunedin
    Period23/11/1426/11/14

    Keywords

    • Accessibility
    • Education
    • Learning and teaching
    • UDE
    • UDI
    • UDL
    • Universal design

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