The Ophiuchus cluster and a large-scale structure towards the galactic centre

K. Wakamatsu, M. A. Malkan, M. T. Nishida, Quentin A. Parker, W. Saunders, F. G. Watson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

    Abstract

    The Ophiuchus Cluster is one of the most luminous X-ray clusters in the local Universe, and may be a key cluster for the local large-scale structure. Our preliminary redshift-survey with FLAIR and 6dF for the cluster shows the following: 1) a velocity dispersion of the Ophiuchus cluster is found to be 1050 ± 50 km s−1, which is consistent with its large X-ray luminosity, 2) the cluster accompanies several clusters and groups of galaxies within a distance of 8° from the cluster centre, implying that it is a large and massive enough to be classified as a supercluster, 3) from its closeness to the position of the Great Attractor in the sky, the Ophiuchus Supercluster may play some role in its gravitational potential, as may the Shapley Concentration, and 4) there is an extensive foreground void up to cz ≈ 4000 km s−1 in the survey area, implying that it is a continuation of the Local Void.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAstronomical Society of the Pacific conference series
    Subtitle of host publicationNearby large-scale structures and the zone of avoidance
    Place of PublicationMichigan, USA
    PublisherAstronomical Society of the Pacific
    Pages189-198
    Number of pages10
    ISBN (Print)1583811923
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    EventNearby Large-Scale Structures and the Zone of Avoidance - Cape Town, South Africa
    Duration: 28 Mar 20042 Apr 2004

    Publication series

    NameASP Conference Series
    PublisherAstronomical Society of the Pacific
    Volume329

    Conference

    ConferenceNearby Large-Scale Structures and the Zone of Avoidance
    CityCape Town, South Africa
    Period28/03/042/04/04

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