The pain course

A randomised controlled trial examining an internet-delivered pain management program when provided with different levels of clinician support

Blake F. Dear*, Milena Gandy, Eyal Karin, Lauren G. Staples, Luke Johnston, Vincent J. Fogliati, Bethany M. Wootton, Matthew D. Terides, Rony Kayrouz, Kathryn Nicholson Perry, Louise Sharpe, Michael K. Nicholas, Nickolai Titov

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)
22 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The present study evaluated an internet-delivered pain management program, the Pain Course, when provided with different levels of clinician support. Participants (n = 490) were randomised to 1 of 4 groups: (1) Regular Contact (n = 143), (2) Optional Contact (n = 141), (3) No Contact (n = 131), and (4) a treatment-as-usual Waitlist Control Group (n = 75). The treatment program was based on the principles of cognitive behaviour therapy and comprised 5 internet-delivered lessons provided over 8 weeks. The 3 Treatment Groups reported significant improvements (between-group Cohen's d; avg. reduction) in disability (ds ≥ 0.50; avg. reduction ≥ 18%), anxiety (ds ≥ 0.44; avg. reduction ≥ 32%), depression (ds ≥ 0.73; avg. reduction ≥ 36%), and average pain (ds ≥ 0.30; avg. reduction ≥ 12%) immediately posttreatment, which were sustained at or further improved to 3-month follow-up. High treatment completion rates and levels of satisfaction were reported, and no marked or consistent differences were observed between the Treatment Groups. The mean clinician time per participant was 67.69 minutes (SD = 33.50), 12.85 minutes (SD = 24.61), and 5.44 minutes (SD = 12.38) for those receiving regular contact, the option of contact, and no clinical contact, respectively. These results highlight the very significant public health potential of carefully designed and administered internet-delivered pain management programs and indicate that these programs can be successfully administered with several levels of clinical support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1920-1935
Number of pages16
JournalPain
Volume156
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015

Bibliographical note

Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Internet
  • Online
  • Pain management
  • Cognitive behaviour therapy
  • CBT
  • Pain
  • Chronic pain
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Disability

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The pain course: A randomised controlled trial examining an internet-delivered pain management program when provided with different levels of clinician support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this