The phylogeny of Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin: Studies on the holostean fish Lepisosteus platyrhincus and the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri

Lorraine K. McDonald, Jean M. P. Joss, Robert M. Dores

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Abstract

Acid extracts of the brain of the holostean fish Lepisosteus platyrhincus and the forebrain of the dipnoan fish Neoceratodus forsteri were separately fractionated by Sephadex G-50 column chromatography. For both species, Met-enkephalin-related immunoreactivity was detected coeluting with the total volume internal standard. Higher-molecular-weight Met-enkephalin-containing immunoreactive peaks were not detected in these chromatographs. Furthermore, immunoreactive forms with antigenic determinants identical to mammalian dynorphin A(1-17), dynorphin A(1-8), α-neo-endorphin, or dynorphin B(1-13) were not detected in either species. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of enkephalin-sized immunoreactive material indicated the presence of authentic Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin in the extracts of both species. In the brain of L. platyrhincus the molar ratio of Met-enkephalin to Leu-enkephalin was approximately 3:1, whereas, the molar ratio of these enkephalins in the forebrain of N. forsteri was approximately 14:1. C-terminally extended forms of Met-enkephalin were also detected in the extracts of both species. These results suggest that the ancestral proenkephalin gene of both actinopterygian and sarcopterygian fish contained both the Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin sequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-236
Number of pages9
JournalGeneral and Comparative Endocrinology
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Bibliographical note

Erratum can be found in General and Comparative Endocrinology, 85(3), p. 494, 1992, https://doi.org/10.1016/0016-6480(92)90096-3

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