The practice of PACE

lessons learned and imagined futures

Lindie Clark*, Judyth Sachs

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    PACE has been the work of many people - students, university staff, industry and community partners foremost amongst them. The challenge for the future development of PACE is, given what we have learned from our past and current activity, how do we use the learnings, insights and unintended outcomes to shape and optimize imagined futures for the program? There will be many challenges to confront in the years ahead as the program continues to ‘engage and serve the community’ and ‘improve and refine a curriculum that has personal transformation at its very core’ (Sachs, J, Preface. In: Sachs J, Clark L (eds) Learning through community engagement: vision and practice in higher education. Springer, Dordrect, 2016). How best can we meet these challenges, key amongst them being to ensure that PACE continues to deliver quality experiences and impact for its key constituencies as the number and diversity of students, partners and activities grows? Befitting the centrality of reflective practice to PACE (Harvey M, Baker M, Semple AL, Lloyd K, McLachlan K, Walkerden G, Fredericks V, Reflection for learning: a holistic approach to disrupting the text. In: Sachs J, Clark L (eds) Learning through community engagement: vision and practice in higher education. Springer, Dordrecht, 2016.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationLearning through community engagement
    Subtitle of host publicationvision and practice in higher education
    EditorsJudyth Sachs, Lindie Clark
    Place of PublicationSingapore
    PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
    Pages275-288
    Number of pages14
    ISBN (Electronic)9789811009990
    ISBN (Print)9789811009976
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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