The Presidentialisation of Australian Politics? Kevin Rudd's Leadership of the Australian Labor Party

Glenn Kefford*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The presidentialisation debate centres on the question of whether contemporary political leaders in parliamentary systems are more powerful than their predecessors. This article applies the presidentialisation thesis of Poguntke and Webb (2005) to the period in which Kevin Rudd led the federal parliamentary Labor Party in Australia. Their model identifies three distinct faces of presidentialisation: the executive face, the party face and the electoral face. This article argues that the evidence of presidentialisation under Rudd's leadership is mixed. The most compelling evidence is reflected in how Rudd interacted with the Labor Party, rather than his interaction with the executive or impact on voting behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-146
Number of pages12
JournalAustralian Journal of Political Science
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australian politics
  • political leadership
  • political parties
  • presidentialisation

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