The prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy and irritability in Alzheimer's disease

S. E. Starkstein*, R. Migliorelli, F. Manes, A. Tesón, G. Petracca, E. Chemerinski, L. Sabe, R. Leiguarda

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the prevalence and correlates of apathy and irritability in a consecutive series of 101 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Based on clinical criteria, 46 (46%) patients had apathy, and 13 (13%) patients had irritability. Apathy was significantly associated with more severe impairments in activities of daily living, significantly more severe extrapyramidal signs, and a significantly higher frequency of both major depression and dysthymia. Patients with irritability had significantly more severe impairments in activities of daily living and significantly higher depression and anosognosia scores. On the other hand, neither apathy nor irritability were significantly associated with deficits in specific cognitive domains. 1995 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)540-546
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Apathy
  • Irritability

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy and irritability in Alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this