The reading game - Encouraging learners to become question-makers rather than question-takers by getting feedback, Making friends and having fun

Robert Parker*, Maurizio Manuguerra, Bruce Schaefer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Reading Game is a question and answer game designed to engage learners in the content of their coursework. The class of student participants creates a collective learning space where every action serves to introduce, build, or clarify concepts from the curriculum. The quality of the multiple-choice questions and the contents of the quizzes are determined by the participants who receive points for their efforts in both asking and answering questions. Participants can comment on and rate questions deemed outstanding by their peers, which directly impacts the contents of review quizzes. Participants progress to the next level of the game using their accumulated points onto asking open questions to the teachers and their cohort. Writing good questions is the winning strategy of the game. The key claim in the Reading Game is that creating questions is one of the fundamental cognitive elements that guide our conscious reasoning.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationElectric Dreams
Subtitle of host publication30th Ascilite Conference 2013 Proceedings
EditorsH. Carter, M. Gosper, J. Hedberg
Place of PublicationNorth Ryde, NSW
PublisherMacquarie University
Pages681-684
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781741384031
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event30th Annual conference on Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2013 - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 1 Dec 20134 Dec 2013

Other

Other30th Annual conference on Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2013
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period1/12/134/12/13

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