The recruitment and description of university students who self-report difficulty acquiring early reading skills

Melissa McGonnell, Rauno Parrila, Helene S. Deacon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Self-report is a time- and cost-efficient screening measure that has the potential to be useful as a stand-alone means of recruiting adults for participation in reading research. We report on a sample of university students (N=46) recruited using the Adult Reading History Questionnaire-Revised, half of whom reported early difficulty with reading acquisition. As a group, those reporting early difficulty with reading had poorer current reading skills than those who did not. Some (n=13) of those who reported early reading difficulty appear to have compensated for this. We conclude that self-report has the potential to be used as an effective screening measure in research targeting adults with a history of early reading difficulties. (Contains 3 tables.)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-174
Number of pages20
JournalExceptionality Education Canada
Volume17
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Canada
  • Early Reading
  • Higher Education
  • Reading Research
  • College Students
  • Reading Skills
  • Questionnaires
  • Screening Tests
  • Self Evaluation (Individuals)
  • Adults
  • Foreign Countries
  • Reading Difficulties
  • Student Recruitment

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The recruitment and description of university students who self-report difficulty acquiring early reading skills'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this