The Relationship Between Eating Attitudes, Body Mass Index, Age, and Gender in Australian University Students

Dianna Kenny*, Roger Adams

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    University students (N = 1485) completed the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) from Garner and Olmsted (1984) and a questionnaire designed to obtain physical and social background data. Although body mass indices (BMI) for females were lower than for males, females were more dissatisfied with their bodies and had higher drive for thinness than males across all categories of BMI. Even the most overweight (BMI > 30) males were more satisfied with their bodies than the most underweight females. This subgroup (BMI = 16–17) had profiles which were most discrepant from the Garner and Olmsted EDI profile for anorexic females, that is, their scores on the subscales of drive for thinness, bulimia, body dissatisfaction, and ineffectiveness were lower than those found for females in all other categories of BMI. Results indicated that the eating attitudes of this sample of Australian university students were similar to those previously reported for American and British students. This study supports the view that sociocultural variables have aetiological significance in shaping female Australian university students' eating attitudes and behaviours. However, these variables alone do not appear sufficient to account for the development of an eating disorder. 1994 Australian Psychological Society

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)128-134
    Number of pages7
    JournalAustralian Psychologist
    Volume29
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Relationship Between Eating Attitudes, Body Mass Index, Age, and Gender in Australian University Students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this