The relationship between extra-coronary calcification and coronary artery lesion characteristics

S. Abeid, C. Yu, K. Ho-Shon, J. Magnussen, A. Yong, C. Naoum

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Abstract

Background: Calcifications in non–coronary cardiac and vascular locations are frequently observed in imaging modalities, including echocardiography and non–cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous studies have shown an association between extra-coronary calcification and risk factors of cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of extra-coronary calcification, and explore the association with coronary disease severity and plaque characteristics. Method: In total, 200 consecutive patients who underwent CT coronary angiography at our institution had coronary calcium score and lesion characteristics assessed by two experienced Level B readers. The CT scans were reviewed by a third blinded reader to measure the calcium score at four extra-coronary sites including the aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta. Results: The prevalence of extra-coronary calcification at any site was 53%. The prevalence of aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta calcification were 36.5%, 12%, 9%, and 35.5%, respectively. Patients with extra-coronary calcium score (ECCS) >0 had a higher prevalence of coronary calcification than patients without extra-coronary calcification (42% vs 16.5%; p < 0.001). Extra-coronary calcium score correlated with coronary calcium score ( r = 0.520; p < 0.001) and age ( r = 0.632; p < 0.001). Patients with extra-coronary calcification were more likely to have calcified plaques than patients with no extra-coronary calcification (67.9% vs 27.2%; p < 0.001). Patients with ECCS >400 had higher rates of significant coronary stenosis (>50% stenosis in ≥1 artery) than patients with ECCS ≤400 (55% vs 13.8%; p < 0.001). Conclusion : An ECCS>400 was associated with the presence of significant coronary disease. The clinical relevance of extra-coronary calcification in non–coronary imaging modalities warrants further investigation

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Coronary Vessels
Calcium
Thoracic Aorta
Aortic Valve
Coronary Disease
Aorta
Tomography
Coronary Stenosis
Coronary Angiography
Blood Vessels
Echocardiography
Pathologic Constriction
Cardiovascular Diseases
Arteries

Cite this

@article{699c462e171f481ba53098e7873fdc8c,
title = "The relationship between extra-coronary calcification and coronary artery lesion characteristics",
abstract = "Background: Calcifications in non–coronary cardiac and vascular locations are frequently observed in imaging modalities, including echocardiography and non–cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous studies have shown an association between extra-coronary calcification and risk factors of cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of extra-coronary calcification, and explore the association with coronary disease severity and plaque characteristics. Method: In total, 200 consecutive patients who underwent CT coronary angiography at our institution had coronary calcium score and lesion characteristics assessed by two experienced Level B readers. The CT scans were reviewed by a third blinded reader to measure the calcium score at four extra-coronary sites including the aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta. Results: The prevalence of extra-coronary calcification at any site was 53{\%}. The prevalence of aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta calcification were 36.5{\%}, 12{\%}, 9{\%}, and 35.5{\%}, respectively. Patients with extra-coronary calcium score (ECCS) >0 had a higher prevalence of coronary calcification than patients without extra-coronary calcification (42{\%} vs 16.5{\%}; p < 0.001). Extra-coronary calcium score correlated with coronary calcium score ( r = 0.520; p < 0.001) and age ( r = 0.632; p < 0.001). Patients with extra-coronary calcification were more likely to have calcified plaques than patients with no extra-coronary calcification (67.9{\%} vs 27.2{\%}; p < 0.001). Patients with ECCS >400 had higher rates of significant coronary stenosis (>50{\%} stenosis in ≥1 artery) than patients with ECCS ≤400 (55{\%} vs 13.8{\%}; p < 0.001). Conclusion : An ECCS>400 was associated with the presence of significant coronary disease. The clinical relevance of extra-coronary calcification in non–coronary imaging modalities warrants further investigation",
author = "S. Abeid and C. Yu and K. Ho-Shon and J. Magnussen and A. Yong and C. Naoum",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.hlc.2018.06.531",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "S281--S282",
journal = "Heart, lung and circulation",
issn = "1443-9506",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "Supplement 2",

}

The relationship between extra-coronary calcification and coronary artery lesion characteristics. / Abeid, S.; Yu, C.; Ho-Shon, K.; Magnussen, J.; Yong, A.; Naoum, C.

In: Heart, lung and circulation, Vol. 27, No. Supplement 2, 0530, 2018, p. S281-S282.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between extra-coronary calcification and coronary artery lesion characteristics

AU - Abeid,S.

AU - Yu,C.

AU - Ho-Shon,K.

AU - Magnussen,J.

AU - Yong,A.

AU - Naoum,C.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background: Calcifications in non–coronary cardiac and vascular locations are frequently observed in imaging modalities, including echocardiography and non–cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous studies have shown an association between extra-coronary calcification and risk factors of cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of extra-coronary calcification, and explore the association with coronary disease severity and plaque characteristics. Method: In total, 200 consecutive patients who underwent CT coronary angiography at our institution had coronary calcium score and lesion characteristics assessed by two experienced Level B readers. The CT scans were reviewed by a third blinded reader to measure the calcium score at four extra-coronary sites including the aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta. Results: The prevalence of extra-coronary calcification at any site was 53%. The prevalence of aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta calcification were 36.5%, 12%, 9%, and 35.5%, respectively. Patients with extra-coronary calcium score (ECCS) >0 had a higher prevalence of coronary calcification than patients without extra-coronary calcification (42% vs 16.5%; p < 0.001). Extra-coronary calcium score correlated with coronary calcium score ( r = 0.520; p < 0.001) and age ( r = 0.632; p < 0.001). Patients with extra-coronary calcification were more likely to have calcified plaques than patients with no extra-coronary calcification (67.9% vs 27.2%; p < 0.001). Patients with ECCS >400 had higher rates of significant coronary stenosis (>50% stenosis in ≥1 artery) than patients with ECCS ≤400 (55% vs 13.8%; p < 0.001). Conclusion : An ECCS>400 was associated with the presence of significant coronary disease. The clinical relevance of extra-coronary calcification in non–coronary imaging modalities warrants further investigation

AB - Background: Calcifications in non–coronary cardiac and vascular locations are frequently observed in imaging modalities, including echocardiography and non–cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous studies have shown an association between extra-coronary calcification and risk factors of cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of extra-coronary calcification, and explore the association with coronary disease severity and plaque characteristics. Method: In total, 200 consecutive patients who underwent CT coronary angiography at our institution had coronary calcium score and lesion characteristics assessed by two experienced Level B readers. The CT scans were reviewed by a third blinded reader to measure the calcium score at four extra-coronary sites including the aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta. Results: The prevalence of extra-coronary calcification at any site was 53%. The prevalence of aortic valve, mitral annulus, and ascending and descending aorta calcification were 36.5%, 12%, 9%, and 35.5%, respectively. Patients with extra-coronary calcium score (ECCS) >0 had a higher prevalence of coronary calcification than patients without extra-coronary calcification (42% vs 16.5%; p < 0.001). Extra-coronary calcium score correlated with coronary calcium score ( r = 0.520; p < 0.001) and age ( r = 0.632; p < 0.001). Patients with extra-coronary calcification were more likely to have calcified plaques than patients with no extra-coronary calcification (67.9% vs 27.2%; p < 0.001). Patients with ECCS >400 had higher rates of significant coronary stenosis (>50% stenosis in ≥1 artery) than patients with ECCS ≤400 (55% vs 13.8%; p < 0.001). Conclusion : An ECCS>400 was associated with the presence of significant coronary disease. The clinical relevance of extra-coronary calcification in non–coronary imaging modalities warrants further investigation

U2 - 10.1016/j.hlc.2018.06.531

DO - 10.1016/j.hlc.2018.06.531

M3 - Meeting abstract

VL - 27

SP - S281-S282

JO - Heart, lung and circulation

T2 - Heart, lung and circulation

JF - Heart, lung and circulation

SN - 1443-9506

IS - Supplement 2

M1 - 0530

ER -