The relationship between general measures of fitness, passive range of motion and whole-body movement quality

David Frost, Jordan Andersen, Thomas Lam, Tim Finlay, Kevin Darby, Stuart McGill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to establish relationships between fitness (torso endurance, grip strength and pull-ups), hip range of motion (ROM) (extension, flexion, internal and external rotation) and movement quality in an occupational group with physical work demands. Fifty-three men from the emergency task force of a major city police force were investigated. The movement screen comprised standing and seated posture, gait, segmental spine motion and 14 tasks designed to challenge whole-body coordination. Relationships were established between each whole-body movement task, the measures of strength, endurance and ROM. In general, fitness and ROM were not strongly related to the movement quality of any task. This has implications for worker training, in that strategies developed to improve ROM or strength about a joint may not enhance movement quality.

Practitioner Summary: Worker-centered injury prevention can be described as fitting workers to tasks by improving fitness and modifying movement patterns; however, the current results show weak correlations between strength, endurance and ROM, and the way individuals move. Therefore, the development of occupation-specific injury prevention strategies may require both fitness and movement-oriented objectives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-649
Number of pages13
JournalErgonomics
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • movement screen
  • police force
  • injury
  • strength
  • torso endurance

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