The relationship between obligatory cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) and functional measures in young infants

Maryanne Golding*, Wendy Pearce, John Seymour, Alison Cooper, Teresa Ching, Harvey Dillon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Finding ways to evaluate the success of hearing aid fittings in young infants has increased in importance with the implementation of hearing screening programs. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) can be recorded in infants and provides evidence for speech detection at the cortical level. The validity of this technique as a tool of hearing aid evaluation needs, however, to be demonstrated. The present study examined the relationship between the presence/absence of CAEPs to speech stimuli and the outcomes of a parental questionnaire in young infants who were fitted with hearing aids. The presence/absence of responses was determined by an experienced examiner as well as by a statistical measure, Hotelling's T2. A statistically significant correlation between CAEPs and questionnaire scores was found using the examiner's grading (rs = 0.45) and using the statistical grading (rs = 0.41), and there was reasonably good agreement between traditional response detection methods and the statistical analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cortical auditory evoked potentials
  • Hearing aids
  • Infants questionnaire

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