The relationship between prospective memory, working memory and self-rated memory performance in individuals with intellectual disability

Anna Levén*, Björn Lyxell, Jan Andersson, Henrik Danielsson, Jerker Rönnberg

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In the present study, prospective memory, working memory and self-rated memory performance were assessed in five individuals with intellectual disability and 10 individuals without intellectual disability. Prospective memory was taxed by means of a video-based procedure and a more naturalistic task, working memory was taxed by means of digit and picture span tasks, and a questionnaire was used to measure self-rated prospective and retrospective memory. The spread of performance was wide on prospective memory and working memory tasks, foremost for individuals with intellectual disability. Self-rated memory did not differ between the two groups, although there were large differences in memory performance on the other memory tasks. The results are interpreted in terms of how limitations in working memory contribute to prospective memory failures among individuals with intellectual disability. To remember 'when to' perform a prospective memory task seems to be more difficult to master than remembering 'what to do' for individuals with intellectual disability.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)207-223
    Number of pages17
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Disability Research
    Volume13
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

    Keywords

    • Intellectual disability
    • Prospective memory
    • Working memory

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