The relationship between teacher self-efficacy and attributions of the educational outcomes of students with specific learning disabilities

Stuart Woodcock, Jayne Emms

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Over recent years the move towards a more inclusive learning environment has brought about greater tension and challenges for teachers to cater for all students' needs. Furthermore, the impact teachers' expectations and attributions may have on students' learning, as well as their own judgements in their ability to motivate students and promote learning in diverse inclusive classrooms, has become more important. Moreover, students with a specific learning disability (SLD) form a large group of students in inclusive classrooms. This study examined 366 trainee elementary teachers to investigate whether trainee teachers' self-efficacy influenced their attributions towards students with and without SLD. Results showed that those trainee teachers who held higher levels of general teacher self-efficacy were more positive in their feedback and less frustrated to students with and without SLD. Also, those who held higher levels of personal teacher self-efficacy held lower expectations for failure towards students with and without SLD. Implications and recommendations for practice and research conclude the paper.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-15
    Number of pages15
    JournalInternational Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities
    Volume22
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Keywords

    • Attribution
    • Specific learning disabilities
    • Teacher self-efficacy
    • Trainee teacher

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