The relationship of intravenous fluid chloride content to kidney function in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock

Faheem W. Guirgis*, Deborah J.williams, Matthew Hale, Abubakr A. Bajwa, Adil Shujaat, Nisha Patel, Colleen J. Kalynych, Alan E. Jones, Robert L. Wears, Sunita Dodani

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies suggest a relationship between chloride-rich intravenous fluids and acute kidney injury in critically ill patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of intravenous fluid chloride content to kidney function in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed to determine (1) quantity and type of bolus intravenous fluids, (2) serum creatinine (Cr) at presentation and upon discharge, and (3) need for emergent hemodialysis (HD) or renal replacement therapy (RRT). Linear regression was used for continuous outcomes, and logistic regression was used for binary outcomes and results were controlled for initial Cr. The primary outcome was change in Cr from admission to discharge. Secondary outcomes were need for HD/RRT, length of stay (LOS), mortality, and organ dysfunction. Results: There were 95 patients included in the final analysis; 48% (46) of patients presented with acute kidney injury, 8% (8) required first-time HD or RRT, 61% (58) were culture positive, 55% (52) were in shock, and overall mortality was 20% (19). There was no significant relationship between quantity of chloride administered in the first 24 hours with change in Cr (β=-0.0001, t=-0.86, R2=0.92, P=.39), need for HD or RRT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.999; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.999-1.000; P = .77), LOS N14 days (OR = 1.000; 95% CI, 0.999- 1.000; P = .68), mortality (OR = 0.999; 95% CI, 0.999-1.000; P = .88), or any type of organ dysfunction. Conclusion: Chloride administered in the first 24 hours did not influence kidney function in this cohort with severe sepsis or septic shock.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-443
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

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