The relationships between academic self-efficacy, computer self-efficacy, prior experience, and satisfaction with online learning

Shazia K. Jan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the relationships between academic self-efficacy (ASE), computer self-efficacy (CSE), prior experience, and satisfaction with online learning and explored how ASE, CSE, and satisfaction vary with age and gender. One hundred and three graduate students enrolled in purely online courses in January 2014 at a university in the midwestern United States participated in the survey. Scales with known reliability were used to measure ASE, CSE, and satisfaction. The study showed a significant positive correlation among all the variables except CSE and satisfaction. Regression analysis showed ASE to be most predictive of satisfaction with online learning. Females had a higher mean ASE than males, and participants aged thirty-five years and above had a higher mean CSE than younger participants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-40
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Distance Education
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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