The research-teaching nexus

A case study of students' awareness, experiences and perceptions of research

Mick Healey*, Fiona Jordan, Barney Pell, Chris Short

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents a case study of students' awareness, experiences and perceptions of research in a 'new' university in the UK. The findings are based on a questionnaire of almost 200 students and five small group interviews. Many of the students participating in this research perceived clear benefits to their learning from staff research, including being taught by enthusiastic staff, enhanced staff credibility, and the reflected glory of being taught by well-known researchers. However, they also perceived disadvantages, particularly with regard to staff availability, and did not believe that staff research should take priority over their needs as learners. They recognised that their awareness of the nature of research and the development of research skills increased most when they were actively involved in undertaking research projects. Several students also perceived benefits for future employment from their participation in research activities. The questionnaire has been used by several other universities around the world to benchmark their practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-246
Number of pages12
JournalInnovations in Education and Teaching International
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Experiences and perceptions
  • Research and teaching linkages
  • Research awareness
  • Research-teaching nexus
  • Student experience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The research-teaching nexus: A case study of students' awareness, experiences and perceptions of research'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this