The Right of visit and the 2005 Protocol on the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation

Natalie Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On October 14, 2005, a second Protocol to the 1988 Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (1988 Convention) was adopted at the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The 1988 Convention had been developed as a response to the hijacking of the Italian vessel, the Achille Lauro, in Egyptian waters, and the murder onboard of a United States national. Austria, Egypt and Italy proposed the adoption of a treaty under the auspices of the IMO to set forth "comprehensive requirements for the suppression of unlawful acts committed against the safety of maritime navigation which endanger innocent human lives; jeopardise the safety of persons and property; seriously affect the operation of maritime services and, thus, are of grave concern to the international community as a whole." The importance of this treaty at the time of its adoption was that it identified certain unlawful acts against ships and provided bases by which states could establish jurisdiction over the perpetrators of those unlawful acts. What was missing from the 1988 Convention was effectively a means to apprehend offenders. The inclusion of a procedure in the 2005 Protocol to allow states to board ships marks a shift from merely providing lawful bases to establish jurisdiction to creating the means to exercise jurisdiction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-332
Number of pages46
JournalDenver journal of international law and policy
Volume35
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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