The Role of abstraction in learning about rates of change

Ibrahim Hassan, Michael Mitchelmore

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

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    Abstract

    Fourteen Year 11 advanced mathematics students participated in individual teaching interviews designed to investigate how they learnt various rate of change concepts. The theoretical framework compared two models of abstraction: the empirical abstraction model of Mitchelmore and White and the nested RBC model of Hershkowitz, Schwarz, and Dreyfus. Examples of learning were found that fitted the nested RBC model, but none that fitted the empirical abstraction model. It was concluded that the nested RBC model is valuable for understanding student learning of the concepts of average and instantaneous rate of change, but that empirical abstraction is likely to be more valuable in understanding how students develop a global concept of rate of change earlier.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIdentities cultures and learning spaces
    Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the 29th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
    EditorsPeter Grootenboer, Robyn Zevenbergen, Mohan Chinnappan
    Place of PublicationAdelaide, S. Aust.
    PublisherMERGA
    Pages278-285
    Number of pages8
    ISBN (Print)1920846123
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    EventMathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Conference (29th : 2006) - Canberra, ACT
    Duration: 1 Jul 20065 Jul 2006

    Conference

    ConferenceMathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Conference (29th : 2006)
    CityCanberra, ACT
    Period1/07/065/07/06

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Incorporated. Original published at (http://www.merga.net.au/node/38?year=2006). Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further reproduction rights please contact the publisher at http://www.merga.net.au

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