The role of bacterial biofilms in device-associated infection

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    There is increasing evidence that bacterial biofilm is responsible for the failure of medical devices, leading to device-associated infection. As plastic surgeons, we are among the leading users of prostheses in surgery, and it is important that we are kept informed of this growing problem. This article summarizes the pathogenesis of device-associated infection, outlines the evidence for such infection in a number of medical devices, and outlines operative strategies aimed at reducing the risk of bacterial contamination at the time of device deployment. It also outlines strategies under investigation to combat the development of device-associated infection.

    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1319-1328
    Number of pages10
    JournalPlastic and reconstructive surgery
    Volume132
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

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    Biofilms
    Equipment and Supplies
    Infection
    Equipment Failure
    Prostheses and Implants

    Cite this

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    title = "The role of bacterial biofilms in device-associated infection",
    abstract = "There is increasing evidence that bacterial biofilm is responsible for the failure of medical devices, leading to device-associated infection. As plastic surgeons, we are among the leading users of prostheses in surgery, and it is important that we are kept informed of this growing problem. This article summarizes the pathogenesis of device-associated infection, outlines the evidence for such infection in a number of medical devices, and outlines operative strategies aimed at reducing the risk of bacterial contamination at the time of device deployment. It also outlines strategies under investigation to combat the development of device-associated infection.",
    author = "Deva, {Anand K.} and Adams, {William P.} and Karen Vickery",
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    language = "English",
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    journal = "Plastic and reconstructive surgery",
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    The role of bacterial biofilms in device-associated infection. / Deva, Anand K.; Adams, William P.; Vickery, Karen.

    In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery, Vol. 132, No. 5, 11.2013, p. 1319-1328.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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