The role of Cambodian civil society in the victim participation scheme of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

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Abstract

One of the most interesting features of the ECCC is that it combines an extensive victim participation scheme with a collective reparations mandate. However, it has been a gradual learning curve for the ECCC to manage the participation of more than 8,000 victims in its proceedings. Benefiting from its in-country location, the ECCC has been able to rely on collaboration with relatively strong and proactive local civil society organisations. Working primarily at the intersection between the Court and society, these NGOs have assumed various roles in support of the ECCC’s victim participation process, some of which would more commonly fall within the responsibility of a court. This chapter explores the main roles Cambodian NGOs play in the ECCC’s victim participation scheme and draws some preliminary observations at a point where the Court has completed its first case and is in the midst of trial hearings in its second case.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVictims of international crimes
Subtitle of host publicationan interdisciplinary discourse
EditorsThorsten Bonacker, Christoph Safferling
Place of PublicationThe Hague, The Netherlands
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages345-372
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9789067049122
ISBN (Print)9789067049115
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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